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2019: A Peek Inside the bOing 2019 Daedalum Luminarium

Architects of Air will be returning to bOing! 2019 with their Daedalum Luminarium, which features a rainbow coloured tree amongst its egg-shaped domes, as well as a lofty ceiling inspired by the Pantheon of Rome.

Our bOing! festival visitors love the labyrinthine tunnels and colourful, cavernous domes – and they’re not alone! Since 1992, over 3 million visitors in more than 40 countries across 5 continents have immersed themselves in the spectacular, luminous world of Architects of Air.

So, what is a Luminarium?

Architects of Air describe a luminarium as ‘a sculpture people enter to be moved to a sense of wonder at the beauty of light and colour’. The luminaria designed by company founder Alan Parkinson are inspired by natural forms and geometric solids, as well as Islamic and Gothic architecture. Each new creation is a maze of winding paths and inspiring domes that reach to the sky, allowing visitors to lose themselves in sensory bliss.

“I design luminaria because I want to share my sense of wonder at the phenomenon of light”.

Alan Parkinson

Ok, got it! So, what is the meaning behind ‘Daedalum’?

Daedalum is named after Daedalus.  In Greek mythology, he was the father of Icarus and the architect of the Labyrinth of Minos. This year’s luminarium draws a lot of inspiration from ancient Greece and Rome, with the Main Dome ceiling loosely inspired by Rome’s Pantheon.

Daedalum’s core element is a maze of 19 egg-shaped domes. The arrangement of the translucent elements that form the dome tops and pods is designed to produce a variety of subtly different colours and hues. This means that as you walk around the Daedalum, the colours will change as you walk from place to place.

Exploring the labyrinth, visitors can also discover two major new elements this year, designed by Alan Parkinson’s son Meko.  The Tree is an adventurous assembly of intersecting volumes rising above our heads, creating many intriguing viewpoints. The Main Dome features an imaginative illumination designed to vary the colour inside according to the sun’s direction.

Watch the trailer to find out more. 

Tickets can be bought on the day (expect queues at busy times). We highly recommend that you book entry in advance for a timeslot – a limited number of tickets are available. Time in the Luminarium is limited to 20 minutes at busy periods, but longer if no queue. Due to the special setting of this event, audience members who want to wish to enter the structure will be asked to remove their shoes.

Children under the age of 16 need to be accompanied by an adult (1 adult to 4 childen). Babies (0-18 months) are free to enter the Luminarium with an adult and do not require a baby ticket.

Daedalum is accessible to wheelchair users and anyone with mobility issues.